Wednesday, July 26, 2017

MORE FABULOUS VINTAGE WEBSITES, FINDS, ETC. FROM EVERYTHING CROTON

An oldie but goodie--an outstanding item from a past auction at Croton's own SeriousToyz.com -- from the 1950's, the Superior (T. Cohen) Service Station "Superior Service Station” #736. Came complete with box, minty, and sold for over $274.00--Wonderful graphics. 

It's followed by a fabulous bit of vintage made in Japan Christmas ktisch...
Santa Claus in chimney--with "putz-abilities"--he's followed by a fabulous photo of silent screen actress Nita Naldi from 1922...

Click on the photos and enjoy.

For those of us who do Halloween displays--now's the time to start crafting: 

WELCOME TO SPOOK HILL, TEMPLATES, PATTERNS, PUTZ HOUSES, HALLOWEEN VILLAGE, TRAINS AND MORE http://bit.ly/2uwydxK

We've been having so much fun going through this paper modelling site: http://papermau.blogspot.com/

BY SPECIAL REQUEST: cardboard putz gazebo template/pattern http://bit.ly/2eMSRV1

12 ITALIAN MOVIE STAR POSTCARDS FROM THE 1950'S AND OUR FRIENDS AT EFSP--includes a very pretty Lauren Bacall  http://bit.ly/2tyUc8n  

And for fans of 1950 to 1960 Christmas lighting: https://oldchristmastreelights.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=11

2 comments:

  1. She was really exotic looking.

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  2. And her real name was MARY DOOLEY! I cold have swore she was Japanese! Here is some more info from Wiki.

    Nita Naldi was born Mary Dooley in New York City into a working class Irish family in 1894 (she was the daughter of Julia (Cronin) and Patrick Dooley).[1] She was named for her great aunt, Mary Nonna Dunphy, who founded Academy of the Holy Angels in Fort Lee, New Jersey, which young Mary Dooley attended in 1910. Her father left the family in 1910, and her mother died in 1915. The latter event left her to care for her two teenage siblings, which forced Naldi to seek work. She took several odd jobs, including artists' model and cloak model. Eventually she entered vaudeville with her brother Frank. By 1918 she debuted on Broadway as a chorus girl at the Winter Garden in "The Passing Show of 1918."

    Her appearance in "The Passing Show of 1918" led to more stage jobs, and soon Naldi found herself in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1918 and 1919. At this time she changed her name to "Nita Naldi," which was an homage to a childhood friend named Florence Rinaldi. She continued working on Broadway, and after a well received performance in "The Bonehead," Naldi was offered a stint with well-known producer William A. Brady. Brady cast her in his play Opportunity in 1920

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